Busted

Busted

There is long-standing precedent in street photography for rejecting images where someone in the scene is looking straight into the lens. I don’t hold with that precedent, because if I did, I’d miss hilarious moments like this one. The incoming freshman and his mom on the left may be oblivious, but the guy waiting for the bus on the right says “Busted!” with only a glance.

Fulfilled

Fulfilled

If it didn’t cost so much to develop and scan, I’d be shooting a lot more film. For preference I’d standardize on Portra 400, with some HP5+ and Ektar 100 for variety. This frame is none of the above, being instead a square crop from some Fuji Superia 400 I had handy for this nice little moment at the bus stop.

Wide Streets

Board Over Bike

Last week I carried my Nikon with me instead of my Fuji, and just to switch things up I used my ultra-wide instead of my normal lens. The experience strongly reinforced the received wisdom about wide-angle lenses: their function is to exaggerate perspective and emphasize something in the foreground, in this case, Mr. Skateboard. Using the ultra-wide also forces me to get in closer to my subject, and I’m often afraid to do so even when it will make a better picture. Gear doesn’t make you a better photographer, but accepting the limitations of a defined set of gear can push you to try different, and sometimes better, things.

Precious

Precious

In my college days, someone posted a graph on the wall of the ACM student chapter office which purported to show when and how much of both regular and diet Mountain Dew one should consume for maximum stimulant effectiveness while programming. I suppose CS students still drink Mountain Dew, but to my mind, nothing beats a good cup of coffee when you’ve been up all night and your homework still doesn’t compile. The young lady above would seem to agree. 🙂

Blurring the Lines

I’ve been doing a lot of motion blur lately while out walking or waiting for the bus. This crossing gets a lot of traffic at the top of the hour, but I have hitherto preferred to capture a few people crossing rather than the great mass of pedestrians.

Passing

Bikes and cars both offer longer lines at the (relatively) fast shutter speeds I use when handholding my X100:

Dead Heat

I can reliably handhold the X100 down to about 1/8 second, if I tuck my elbows, hold my breath after exhaling, and don’t mash the shutter. As a friend of mine described it, it’s like fusing video with still photography: the motion is clearly expressed against a sharp background.